Monday 23 Sep 2019 | 08:48 | SYDNEY
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Asia

Floods: Jakarta's infrastructure deficit

Last week's floods in Jakarta illustrate that the private sector can provide valuable public goods, available free of charge to just about anyone. If you wanted to see how hard it was to get around the city, a free web link (lewatmana.com) gave access to real-time cameras at various strategic

Reader riposte: Rudd's Pax Pacifica

Luke Maynard writes: Hugh White's final blog post of 2012 was characteristic in its effort to sketch the boundaries of Asia's strategic future while remaining firmly rooted in modern realities. In it, White draws parallels between his vision for order in this region with that described by Kevin

Hague: Asian century or global century?

You may have heard by now that UK Foreign Secretary William Hague is cutting short his Australia visit because of the hostage crisis in Algeria (Prime Minister Cameron, too, is changing his plans; the important speech on the eurozone that Mark Thirlwell referred to in his post yesterday has been

The Pakistan march: What next?

Alicia Mollaun, a PhD candidate at the Crawford School at ANU, is based in Islamabad. The winds of change are stirring in Islamabad. On Monday 14 January, tens of thousands of people joined Dr Tahirul Qadri (pictured), a Pakistani-Canadian Sufi scholar, in Lahore on a 'million man' march towards

China and India in the Fiji equation

Professor Wadan Narsey is an Adjunct Professor at The Cairns Institute. The Fiji regime's clear breach of its own decrees and roadmap to democracy, as described in my previous post, has unsettled traditional donors and must also create serious question marks over the continuing support by China

Indonesia's WTO candidate

Peter McCawley is a Visiting Fellow at the Indonesia Project, ANU, and former Dean of the Asia Development Bank Institute, Tokyo. During the first decade of this century we heard a lot about the economic role of China and India but very little about Indonesia. For close to ten years following

Why the Fiji regime rejected the draft constitution

Professor Wadan Narsey is an Adjunct Professor at The Cairns Institute. As Jenny Hayward-Jones described last Friday, the Fiji regime's promise of a transparent and accountable 'roadmap' to parliamentary elections in 2014, following the writing of a new constitution to be approved by a '

Policy experimentation in Afghanistan

From Fred Kaplan's latest column: ...at the end of 2009, Obama sent an additional 33,000 troops to Afghanistan, a surge of nearly 50 percent above the 68,000 already there—and that he did so not to go after bin Laden and al-Qaida (a task that could have been handled with far fewer forces) but

Reader riposte: Burmese and Chinese days

Trish Hamilton writes: Reading Michael Fullilove's post about Burmese Days reminded me of another book which, though it was published in 1971, to my shame, I first read in 2012. I would strongly recommend Barbara W Tuchman's Stillwell and the American Experience in China to anyone interested in

Chuck Hagel and US defence spending

James Brown's post about the nomination of Chuck Hagel as Obama's new Defense Secretary focuses on his views about the Asia 'pivot', but perhaps those views won't matter very much in comparison to the stance Hagel takes on US defence spending overall. President Obama has said that an

Delhi rape protests: India's middle class awakening

Danielle Rajendram is a Research Associate in the Lowy Institute's International Security Program whose work focuses on India and China-India relations. The brutal gang-rape and subsequent death of a 23 year-old woman in New Delhi has shifted gender relations and sexual violence against women to

Chuck Hagel and the Asia pivot

This morning's announcement of Chuck Hagel as President Obama's nominee for Secretary of Defense elicited predictable outrage over Hagel's judgment on Israel. Congressional majority leader Eric Cantor issued a statement concluding, 'Senator Chuck Hagel is the wrong man for the job at such a

Lowy Institute's books of 2012 part V

Part 1 of this series by Lowy Institute research staff here; part 2 here; part 3 here; part 4 here. Burmese Days by George Orwell. Selected by Michael Fullilove. My book of 2012 was first published in 1934. George Orwell's novel Burmese Days is a grim but vivid account of life in Burma in the

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